Tenant-Landlord Law

You are here: Tenant-Landlord Law > Tennessee

Tennessee Tenant-Landlord Law

Tennessee Tenant-Landlord Law
  • AbbreviationFinder.org: Offers list of phrases and slangs abbreviated as TN including Tennessee, and other most commonly used acronyms besides Tennessee.
  • Topschoolsintheusa.com: Provides educational information for what you need to study in the state of Tennessee. Covers educational programs of various subjects (such as law, business, education, engineering, medical) as well as GMAT, GRE, TOEFL and LSAT testing centers in Tennessee.
  • COUNTRYAAH: Interested in doing research on towns or cities in Tennessee? This link below will take you to a full list of cities and complete profiles of each in Tennessee.
  • Songaah Website: Interested in learning popular songs associated with Tennessee? You have come to the right place. Here you can see complete lyrics for all songs about Tennessee.

Federated state of the Central and Eastern USA, 109,152 km², 6,038,803 residents (2006 estimate), 55 residents / km², capital: Nashville-Davidson. Borders: Kentucky (N), Virginia (NE), North Carolina (E), Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi (S), Arkansas and Missouri (W).

Geography

The Tennessee territory extends from the Appalachian mountains (Clingmans Dome, 2024 m) to E, to the middle course of the Mississippi to W. Proceeding from E to W, the Great Smoky Mountains and the Iron Mountains are followed by flat valleys, alternating with narrow mountain ridges stretched in a NE-SW direction, of the so-called Great Appalachian Valley, bounded W by the Walden Ridge, beyond which the Cumberland Plateau extends. The western sector of the state is a wavy region between the Mississippi rivers in W and Tennessee in E. The main rivers, in addition to the aforementioned Mississippi and Tennessee, are Cumberland, the Obion, the Hatchie and the Forked Deer. The climate is semi-continental, with hot summers and relatively mild winters: rainfall is around 1200 mm per year. Economic resources of Tennessee are agriculture (cereals, fodder, cotton, tobacco, vegetables, fruit), breeding (cattle, pigs), the exploitation of forests and subsoil (zinc, for which it is in first place among the Union states; then coal, pyrites, phosphates, copper, mica) and industry, developed in the steel, chemical, textile, food, paper and wood sectors. Main cities, in addition to the capital, are Memphis, Knoxville, Chattanooga, Jackson, Johnson City and Kingsport.

History

Home to numerous Indian tribes, including the Cherokee and the Creeks, the territory that will later be Tennessee received the first white settlements in the second half of the century. XVIII, at the Holston and Watauga rivers. Organized at first (1776-77) as a district and then county of North Carolina, this in 1784 offered its transfer to the United States, but the colonists protested and constituted a "Franklin State" which was not recognized. In 1789 North Carolina re-established its jurisdiction, but the following year it was organized in the Territory (south of the Ohio River) which in 1796 was admitted to the Union as a state with the name of Tennessee. A. Jackson contributed to drafting the Tennessee Constitution, who was also the first representative of the Congress, always remaining in the foreground in the affairs of the state. Becoming prosperous, especially for the production of cotton, in the first half of the nineteenth century, Tennessee participated late and reluctantly in the southern secession; the scene of great battles during the war (Chattanooga, Nashville), it was then, in 1866, the first state to be readmitted to the Union, without going through the "Reconstruction" phase. Economic progress resumed, with industrial development, which soon surpassed that of agriculture. The establishment, in 1933, of the Tennessee Valley Authority, which is part of the broader economic policy program called the New Deal. and the subsequent implementation of the related projects gave a great boost to the economy of Tennessee.

Nashville-Davidson

City ​​(511,263 residents in 1996) and capital of the State of Tennessee (USA), 400 km SE of Saint Louis, 150 m on the left of the Cumberland River. An important road and rail junction and an active agricultural and river port market, it is home to the mechanical, chemical, food, paper, tobacco, textile, footwear and building materials industries. Airport. Fisk University (1865) and Vanderbilt (1873). Founded in 1779, it became the capital of Tennessee in 1843. The last major battle of the Secession War was fought in a strategic position on December 15, 1864. Severely destroyed, it flourished in the century. XX.

Memphis (Tennessee)

City ​​(603,507 residents in 1998; 1,078,151 residents the metropolitan area in 1996) of the State of Tennessee (USA), 300 km to WSW of Nashville, 100 m on the left of the Mississippi River, which here forms the border with l ' Arkansas. Important road and railway junction and active river port, it is a large shopping center (cotton, timber), home to textile (cotton), furniture, food, chemical, glass, mechanical, rubber and paper industries. University. Airport.

Knoxville

City ​​(167,535 residents in 1996) of the State of Tennessee (USA), 230 km E of Nashville, on the high course of the Tennessee River, 271 m on the northern slope of the Great Smoky Mountains (Appalachian Mountains). River port and railway junction, it is an active agricultural (tobacco) and livestock market, home to the food, textile, mechanical, wood and marble processing industries; nearby, coal and zinc deposits. University of Tennessee, founded in 1794. Airport. It was the capital of the state of Tennessee from 1796 to 1812 and from 1817 to 1818.

Chattanooga

City ​​(150,425 residents; 446,096 residents the metropolitan area in 1996) of the State of Tennessee (USA), 185 km SE of Nashville, at the point where the Tennessee River exits Lake Chickamauga. It is an important commercial center and home to the chemical, textile, wood, paper, metalworking and food industries. Hydroelectric plants. University. In 1863 it was the scene of a decisive battle of the Secession war.

Jackson (Tennessee)

City ​​(49,300 residents) of the State of Tennessee (USA), 120 km NE of Memphis. Shopping center and railway junction, it is home to the food, textile, mechanical, chemical, wood and building materials industries. Union University (1825). Airport.

Johnson City

City ​​(39,800 residents) of the State of Tennessee (USA), 145 km ENE of Knoxville, in the Iron Mountains. Agricultural market (cereals, cotton, soybeans, tobacco), is home to food, textile and wood industries. Airport. University (1911).

 
Tenn. - Landlord-Tenant Guide, Loudon & Sevier Counties
Info package printed by the Knoxville Legal Aid Society hones in on the law regarding lessor-lessee relations, specific to two state regions.
http://www.korrnet.org/klas/lltother.htm

Tenn. - Resources for Renters
Citizens of this state can locate services and resources addressing concerns pertaining to rental law and rights. Displays links and contacts.
http://directory.tenantsunion.org/tennessee.html

Tenn. - W.J. Simmons Law Office, Landlord & Tenant
Tenn. residents can access statutory material regarding the state landlord-tenant law, and can learn about info pertaining to specific locales.
http://www.vantek.net/pages/wjslaw/wjsurlta.htm

Tenn. - Your Rights as Tenant Under Landlord-Tenant Act
Knoxville Legal Aid Society disseminates info regarding the Uniform Landlord-Tenant Act, answering common renter queries. Supplies contact data.
http://www.korrnet.org/klas/llt.htm

 

Tennessee
 
AL HI MI NC UT
AK ID MN ND VT
AZ IL MS OH VA
AR IN MO OK WA
CA IA MT OR WV
CO KS NE PA WI
CT KY NV RI WY
DC LA NH SC  
DE ME NJ SD  
FL MD NM TN  
GA MA NY TX  
 
 

Copyright 2020 e Tenant-Landlord Law Directory All Rights Reserved