Attractions in Prague

Prague has a historical buzz about it, and the city has very many sights, especially in the form of old buildings and churches. Here you will find one of the world’s oldest universities, Mozart often stayed in Prague, and the city was considered one of the most important in the Austro – Hungarian monarchy. Here is a selection of the most important sights you can take with you:

Gamlebytorget

Gamlebytorget

The Old Town Square is perhaps where the history of the city is best displayed, and most attractions are within walking distance. Here you can see several different eras meet, with buildings from the Baroque, Renaissance and the Gothic era. One of the major attractions of the square is the astronomical clock Prazky Orloj. There are tourists waiting for the carillon and the figures that look forward when the bells strike for a whole hour. The Gothic Tyn church from the 15th century towers in the background, and you will find a mighty statue of Jan Hus on Gamlebytorget. If you visit Prague during Advent, you should see the Christmas market at Staromestske Namesti.

Prague Castle

Prague Castle

According to DigoPaul.com, the biggest and most beautiful sight in Prague is the castle (Prazsky Hrad). It is located on the highest point of the city and guards the inhabitants. It is a huge structure consisting of several churches, cathedral, theater, watchtower and parks. In the evening it is well lit and is a wonderful reminder of what man did several hundred years ago. Also take a walk in the area around the castle once you are up there. Here the streets are cozy and cobbled, you will find nice little cafes, and you have a short way to, among other things, the ancient monastery Strahov.

The dancing house

The dancing house

Prague is perhaps best known for its historic buildings, but also has modern architecture to offer. The dancing house, Tancici Dum, in the city center is so special that it makes the Leaning Tower of Pisa seem dingy. The house is also called “Fred and Ginger”, after the dancing couple Fred Astair and Ginger Rogers from a number of movies and shows on Broadway in New York. The fun building is designed by world-famous Frank Gehry and Czech-Croatian Vlado Milunic. If you do not just want to photograph the building, you can also enjoy a meal in the restaurant located on the seventh floor.

The Spanish Synagogue and the Jewish Quarter

The Spanish Synagogue and the Jewish Quarter

The Spanish Synagogue is a central part of the Jewish Quarter (Josefov) located in Prague’s Old Town. The synagogue houses an exhibition that illustrates the Jewish history of what is now the Czech Republic, including the atrocities that took place during the Nazi occupation of the country. You will also find five other synagogues in Josefov, in addition to the famous Jewish cemetery, a separate town hall, and Franz Kafka’s home and birthplace. The Jewish Quarter is not only an important historical area, but also a nice place to stroll in, with many good restaurants and cafes.

Charles Bridge

Charles Bridge

Charles Bridge (Karluv Most) is one of the most famous attractions in Prague. It is well over 600 years old, and was built as far back as 1357. The bridge connects Prague’s old town with Mala Strana and the hill where the castle is located. Thus, you can hardly get away from the 610 meter long walk when you have to consider the sights of the city. It is usually full of tourists, so if you want to avoid the large crowds you should arrive early in the morning. The photo opportunities are great on the bridge, and here there is a lot of people’s life among shopkeepers and musicians.

St Vitus-katedralen

St Vitus-katedralen

Another majestic building in Prague is the St Vitus Cathedral, which belongs to the Prazsky Hrad castle district. On the grounds where the cathedral stands, there was previously a basilica, built in 1060. It was again built on an even older rotunda. In 1344, Charles IV (Charles, who takes his name from the sights of half the city) decided that the basilica should be rebuilt. Sometime in the 17th century, St. Vitus Cathedral, as it stands today, was completed. The coronation of kings and queens in what is now the Czech Republic has almost always taken place here since the cathedral was built. The huge church is very well preserved, and as a tourist you can both visit the inside and enjoy the view from the top of the church tower.

Petrinske Sady

Petrinske Sady

Petrin is the small hill to the right if you stand on Charles Bridge and look towards Prague Castle. At the top you have a small copy of the Eiffel Tower in Paris, where you get what is perhaps the city’s best vantage point. The area is a great place to take a stroll in when the weather allows it. Among the pretty buildings you pass you will find, for example, the small castle Zrcadlove Bludiste. Stop by and laugh a little at how weird you look in the mirror room, especially if you travel with children. Prague Observatory is also located on Petrin Hill, with binoculars that let you take a look at Venus if you arrive at the right time. If you do not mind walking up to Petrin, you can take the cable car that goes from the street Ujezd.

National Theater

National Theater

The National Theater in Prague is one of the most dominant and eye-catching buildings, much due to the gilded dome that spreads over the roof. It is beautifully located right next to Voltava, and if you are interested in opera, ballet or classical concerts, a trip inside is a must. Book tickets well in advance, and feel free to put on a nice outfit. The multimedia theater Laterna Magika, which is located right next to the national theater, belongs to the same administration.

David Cerny’s kunst

David Cerny’s kunst

David Cerny is a world-famous Czech sculptor with a slightly different view of things and seaweed. He has teased the whole EU for the Entropa installation, he has been threatened with death by Al-Qaeda for placing a wax doll by Saddam Hussein in an aquarium, and he has been arrested for civil disobedience for painting a Soviet tank pink.. You will find many of his installations around the center of Prague. Take out the map on your smartphone and look up for example “Brownnosing”, “Piss” (outside the restaurant Hergeltova Cihelna owned by the Norwegian Nils Jebens ), Man Hanging Out (outside the pub U Medvidku), Saint Wenceslas or Quo Vadis. You are guaranteed to have a laugh!

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