First Impressions of India

India. One of the oldest existing civilizations. A real motley of cultures, traditions and customs. As in a huge kaleidoscope, you will find a wide variety of natural wonders as well as a wide variety of residents. The differences couldn’t be more opposite: old meets new, poor meets rich, tradition meets modernity and always in line with any religion, campaign or programme. Although India is changing rapidly, much has stood still or is based on another timeless rhythm.

A trip to India needs to be well and carefully prepared and we offer you a guarantee. The factors that can influence a trip are too different, the distances are too great for you to be able to travel and get to know this continent in “two weeks”. Many means of transport, a wide range of hotels and impressive sights make your stay in India a unique experience. If you travel properly, you first visit the most important places and slowly expand the route. These include the “Golden Triangle” with Delhi, Agra and Jaipur. Just seeing the “Taj Mahal” and hearing the poignant story behind it is worth it. Then follow cities like Jaipur, Jodhpur, Udaipur with immeasurable palaces and finally Mumbai follows, again a “world unto itself”. Excursions to Rajastan and the Thar desert follow, a round trip in southern India from Chennai to Cochin or the area around Bubaneshwar or Calcutta. Not to be forgotten: the Laccadives, the ideal place to really “switch off”. It is difficult to get there, but the uniqueness and the pristine nature make up for any effort. The Taj Mahal – the token of love turned to stone in Agra. Sha Jahan, the Mughal Emperor, had this memorial built for his favorite wife, Mumtaz Mahal. Discover with us the so-called Golden Triangle with the fascinating cities of Agra and Jaipur and marvel at the impressive palaces of the Maharajas and the magnificent buildings of the Mughal Empire. Not to be forgotten: the Laccadives, the ideal place to really “switch off”. It is difficult to get there, but the uniqueness and the pristine nature make up for any effort. The Taj Mahal – the token of love turned to stone in Agra. Sha Jahan, the Mughal Emperor, had this memorial built for his favorite wife, Mumtaz Mahal. Discover with us the so-called Golden Triangle with the fascinating cities of Agra and Jaipur and marvel at the impressive palaces of the Maharajas and the magnificent buildings of the Mughal Empire. Not to be forgotten: the Laccadives, the ideal place to really “switch off”. It is difficult to get there, but the uniqueness and the pristine nature make up for any effort. The Taj Mahal – the token of love turned to stone in Agra. Sha Jahan, the Mughal Emperor, had this memorial built for his favorite wife, Mumtaz Mahal. Discover with us the so-called Golden Triangle with the fascinating cities of Agra and Jaipur and marvel at the impressive palaces of the Maharajas and the magnificent buildings of the Mughal Empire. the Mughal Emperor, had this memorial built for his favorite wife Mumtaz Mahal. Discover with us the so-called Golden Triangle with the fascinating cities of Agra and Jaipur and marvel at the impressive palaces of the Maharajas and the magnificent buildings of the Mughal Empire. the Mughal Emperor, had this memorial built for his favorite wife Mumtaz Mahal. Discover with us the so-called Golden Triangle with the fascinating cities of Agra and Jaipur and marvel at the impressive palaces of the Maharajas and the magnificent buildings of the Mughal Empire.

Origin of the name

According to topmbadirectory, the name India is derived from the Indus River. Its name, in turn, goes back to the Sanskrit word sindhu, meaning “river”, via the mediation of ancient Greek (Indos) and ancient Persian. European seafarers referred to all of South and Southeast Asia as India. Terms such as the island of India (“Insulinde”) and the state name of Indonesia bear witness to this. The term East Indies was also used to distinguish them from the Caribbean islands known as the West Indies, which Christopher Columbus discovered while searching for a sea route to India. During the colonial period, the term was gradually reduced to today’s areas of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh, and finally assumed its current meaning when the Indian state was founded.

Geography

At 3,287,490 square kilometers, India is the seventh largest country in the world. It extends in a west-east direction from the 68th to the 97th east longitude over around 3000 kilometers. From north to south, between the 8th and the 37th degree north latitude, the expansion is around 3200 kilometers. India borders six countries: Pakistan (2912 km), China (Tibet Autonomous Region; 3380 km), Nepal (1690 km), Bhutan (605 km), Myanmar (1463 km) and Bangladesh (4053 km). In total, the border length is 14,103 kilometers. Since the northern part of disputed Kashmir has been under Pakistani control since 1949 (post-Kashmir ceasefire), India no longer shares a border with Afghanistan. The country’s coast is around 7,000 kilometers long.

Climate

With the exception of the mountain regions, north and central India has a predominantly subtropical continental climate, while the south and coastal areas have a more maritime tropical climate. In the north, for example, considerable temperature fluctuations occur over the course of the year. In the northern lowlands, December and January are between 10 and 15 °C; in the hottest time between April and June, maximum temperatures of 40 to over 50 °C are possible. In the south, on the other hand, it is (relatively constant) hot all year round.

Wildlife

Thanks to its landscape diversity, India has an extremely diverse animal world. It is estimated that around 350 mammalian, 1200 bird, 400 reptile and 200 amphibian species are native. However, many species only occur in retreat areas such as forests, swamps, mountainous and hilly regions. More than 2,500 species of fish live in Indian waters. India’s largest mammal species is the Indian elephant, which is probably also the best known next to the Bengal tiger. The tiger was threatened with extinction for a long time, but the population was able to recover through the establishment of tiger sanctuaries. However, there are only a few thousand specimens in the wild. Besides the tiger, other big cats live in India, including leopards and lions. The latter are exclusively in Gir National Park in Gujarat, the last retreat of the Asiatic lion. The rare snow leopard inhabits the high mountainous regions of the Himalayas. The best known and most widespread of the smaller carnivore species is the mongoose.

Nature and environmental protection

With a very large variety of species and biodiversity (especially in a narrow strip on the humid tropical south-west coast), a large number of endemic species, genera and families of plants and animals as well as diverse ecosystems, India is counted among the megadiverse countries on earth. In addition, due to the high level of risk, the rainforests of the Western Ghats are managed as a biodiversity hotspot. India has extensive environmental protection legislation, which, however, is poorly implemented in many cases. Almost five percent of the country’s area is designated as nature reserves, which number almost 600, including 92 national parks.

History

The oldest known civilization on the Indian subcontinent and one of the oldest advanced civilizations in the world is the Indus Valley Civilization. Their history goes back at least 5000 years. Since about 1500 BC Aryan tribes are said to have immigrated from the north and brought about the Vedic culture.

First Impressions of India

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